Associations Between Lifestyle Factors And Parkinson’s Disease In An Urban Sri Lankan Clinic Study

  • Ruwani Wijeyekoon John van Geest Centre for Brain Repair, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Cambridge, UK
  • Vindika Suriyakumara Genetic, Diagnostic and Research Laboratory, Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Nugegoda, Sri Lanka
  • Ranjanie Gamage Institute of Neurology, National Hospital of Sri Lanka, Colombo, Sri Lanka
  • Tharushi Fernando Genetic, Diagnostic and Research Laboratory, Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Nugegoda, Sri Lanka
  • Amila Jayasuriya Genetic, Diagnostic and Research Laboratory, Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Nugegoda, Sri Lanka
  • Dhanusha Amarasinghe Genetic, Diagnostic and Research Laboratory, Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Nugegoda, Sri Lanka
  • Harsha Gunasekara Sri Jayewardenepura General Hospital, Nugegoda, Sri Lanka
  • Dharshana Sirisena Neurology Unit, Teaching Hospital, Kurunegala, Sri Lanka
  • Dhammika Amaratunga Independent Statistical Consultant and Researcher, Colombo, Sri Lanka
  • Chanaka Muthukuda University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA
  • Roger A Barker John van Geest Centre for Brain Repair, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Cambridge, UK
  • Caroline Williams-Gray John van Geest Centre for Brain Repair, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Cambridge, UK
  • Ranil De Silva Genetic, Diagnostic and Research Laboratory, Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Nugegoda, Sri Lanka

Abstract

Background- Information on lifestyle factors (eg. coffee /tea drinking, smoking) and Parkinson’s Disease(PD) in South Asia is limited. The objective of this study was to determine associations between lifestyle factors and PD in a clinic-based study in Sri Lanka.


Methods–Demographic and lifestyle factor data was collected from an unselected cohort of PD patients and age and gender-matched controls attending clinics in Greater Colombo, Sri Lanka.


Findings–Of 229 patients with parkinsonism, 144 had Idiopathic PD. Controls numbered 102. Coffee drinkers and smokers were significantly less likely to have PD (coffee, p<0.001; OR=0.264; smoking, p=0.043; OR=0.394). Coffee drinkers were older at PD onset(p<0.001). Similar trends seen with tea drinking were not statistically significant.


Conclusions -This is the first formal study of PD and these lifestyle factors in South Asia. It demonstrates an association between coffee drinking, smoking and a decreased prevalence of PD, and coffee drinking and later age of PD onset.  This is in line with other studies done worldwide, suggesting biological associations with global relevance.

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Published
2017-09-15
How to Cite
WIJEYEKOON, Ruwani et al. Associations Between Lifestyle Factors And Parkinson’s Disease In An Urban Sri Lankan Clinic Study. International Archives of Medicine, [S.l.], v. 10, sep. 2017. ISSN 1755-7682. Available at: <http://imedicalsociety.org/ojs/index.php/iam/article/view/2564>. Date accessed: 17 june 2019. doi: https://doi.org/10.3823/2516.
Section
Neurology